How to Apply for one of the 15K Jobs Building the Rover Pipeline

Last week MDN brought you the news that Energy Transfer’s $3.7 billion, 711-mile Rover Pipeline needs up to 15,000 workers to build it. They currently have ~4,500 workers. And they want to complete the first stage of the pipeline by July (see Help Wanted: 15,000 Workers Needed for Rover Pipeline, STAT!). MDN’s story went viral. It has, so far, been read over 17,000 times on the MDN website–an all-time high for a story less than a week old. The headline and blurb we posted on Facebook has been seen by nearly 72,000 people! The result was that we were flooded with this simple question: Where do I sign up to work on the pipeline? The answer, unfortunately, is not straightforward. We reached out to Energy Transfer multiple times and got less-than-satisfactory answers. Energy Transfer’s answer to the question is this: If you are a contractor or want to try your hand at becoming a contractor, you can try applying via Rover’s contractor online application process (here). However, most people are not interested in that route. They just want to sign up and begin working. For those folks, Rover responded, “Rover is committed to utilizing Union labor 100% for this project. Laborers looking for work, can contact their local union halls.” No help with identifying those local union halls. It is a sort of “you’re on your own” kind of response. Which strikes us as odd. Does Energy Transfer really want to complete this project on time? Could they at least provide a list of the “local union halls” for folks to contact? Apparently not. So we will…
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US Forest Serv OKs Atlantic Coast Pipe Crossing Appalachian Trail

Last Thursday was the last day for people, agencies, nutjobs, supporters–for anyone–to file an official comment with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on the agency’s draft environmental impact statement for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline project. Dominion has proposed building the $5 billion Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP) project from West Virginia through Virginia and into North Carolina. One of the problems they’ve had is resistance from U.S. government agencies, including the U.S. Forest Service. In January 2016, the USFS told Dominion it was a no-go for running the pipeline through tiny pieces of either the Monongahela or George Washington national forests in West Virginia and Virginia (see US Forest Service Blocks Atlantic Coast Pipeline in National Forests). So we found it interesting that USFS, in filing a comment last Tuesday about the project, endorsed Atlantic Coast’s plan to drill underneath the famed Appalachian National Scenic Trail and the Blue Ridge Parkway. The pipeline will drill horizontally underneath both. While it’s good news that the USFS is not blocking the pipeline, the lifers still dug in at the EPA continue to pressure FERC to not release the final EIS, to do “further analysis”–which is code for delay the project until they can figure out a way to kill it. Here’s the good news from the USFS…
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NFG Calls Cuomo DEC Denial of Northern Access Pipe “Troubling”

Yesterday we brought you the sad (and angering) news that once again Gov. Andrew Cuomo has caved to political pressure from environmental Nazis and instructed the now-corrupted Dept. of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to deny stream crossing permits for National Fuel Gas Company’s Northern Access Pipeline project (see Cuomo’s Corrupt NY DEC Blocks NFG Northern Access Pipeline Permit). NFG issued a statement yesterday. They pointed out the following: NFG’s pipeline project would have FAR LESS impact on the environment “than either exploding an entire bridge structure and dropping it into Cattaraugus Creek (Route 219) or developing and continuously operating a massive construction zone in the middle of the Hudson River (Tappan Zee Bridge) for a minimum of five years.” Both of those projects were reviewed and approved by Cuomo’s DEC. NFG points out the utter and complete hypocrisy in the DEC decision. The DEC held talks with NFG about the project for 34 months without proffering major objections. And at the eleventh hour, they pulled this stunt. Without saying so overtly, the NFG statement says Cuomo yanked on the DEC’s chain to make a political decision. While there is no mention of a lawsuit against the DEC, you can bet your bottom dollar such a suit is coming…
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Lansing NY Officials Fight Back Against Tinfoil Hat Fossil Fuel Haters

In February MDN brought you the story of the insanity that exists in Planet Ithaca–about a plan to disallow any new supplies of natural gas to flow to the Town of Lansing (Ithaca suburb) and to forever block any new customers from getting natural gas hookups to their homes and businesses in Lansing (see Anti-Fossil Fuel Hatred Metastasizes in Tompkins County, NY). Members of the Tompkins County Energy and Economic Development Task Force object to building seven miles of 10-inch natural gas pipeline in the Lansing area because the pipeline flows a fossil fuel. They have objected to the point that the local utility company wanting to build it, NYSEG (New York State Electric & Gas), floated an alternative plan: Build a compressor station for existing customers, and no new customers are allowed to receive natgas service. Ever. Period. Just one teeny tiny problem with this bizarro plan: Nobody bothered to talk to the duly elected representatives in Lansing–to the people representing the local population. Those representatives went to Albany to tell the Public Service Commission–and NYSEG–that the so-called alternative plan is nuts (our words). The people and businesses of Lansing want more clean-burning natural gas, not less…
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Grant Twp Antis Threaten to Break Law, Block Legal Injection Well

Two weeks ago MDN brought you the news that not only has the Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP) issued final permits for two new injection wells in the state, they also sued the two townships where those permits were granted because the towns had adopted home rule laws that are illegal, in contravention to state law that give power to permit and control injection wells to the DEP only–not to local municipalities (see PA DEP Issues 2 Wastewater Injection Well Permits, Sues 2 Towns). Grant Township (Indiana County) tried to block Pennsylvania General Energy (PGE) from building a wastewater injection well in the township first by passing an illegal law, stirred up and proposed by the odious Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, or CELDF (see Fed Judge Overturns Grant Twp, PA Ban on Injection Wells). The town then tried to reorganize under a “home rule” charter in order to avoid the judge’s ruling (see Grant Twp, PA Reorganizes to Avoid a Court-Ordered Injection Well). The DEP is now suing Grant (and Highland Township, in Elk County) to nullify those provisions in the home rule charter that affect oil and gas regulation. In the meantime, PGE previously filed a lawsuit against Grant Township, demanding $1 million (see Anti Group CELDF Won’t Help Grant Twp Pay $1M Judgement). On March 31 and April 4, two decisions were handed down by the judge, essentially in PGE’s favor and against Grant. Below we have analysis of those decisions. All of this “bad news” for antis has created the perfect storm in Grant. Antis are now threatening to engage in so-called civil disobedience against the injection well. They plan to shut it down–or go to jail trying. Their leaders are criminals who have done this sort of thing elsewhere…
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OFS Co. Danos Moves Pittsburgh Office to Ohio, Expands in Utica

Some 70 years ago Allen Danos Sr., a descendant of south Louisiana farmers, borrowed $2,000 to start a small tugboat company with his brother-in-law. The small business grew and expanded into the oil and gas business, attracting customers like Gulf Oil (which later became Chevron). Over the years Danos has continued to grow. Today it is an oilfield services company (OFS) servicing some of the world’s largest drillers with coating, construction, environmental, fabrication, instrumentation and electrical, production workforce, project management, consulting and more. Danos is still headquartered in Louisiana (with multiple offices in that state), but also with major offices in Texas–and in the Marcellus/Utica region. Danos is expanding in our region, opening a new facility in Martins Ferry, OH. They’ve also decided to close the Canonsburg, PA office and merge it into the Martins Ferry office. Here’s the announcement…
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How the Marcellus/Utica Saved Compressor Engineering Corp.

Compressor Engineering Corp. (CECO) popped the cork on completing 50 years of business in 2014 when it discovered it had a huge problem. The company had expanded into the pipeline business–laying pipelines–and the people the company had hired to manage that part of the business were dishonest, according to CECO. Money the company thought it had wasn’t there–but they still had to complete projects already signed and sealed. So the company, which works in Ohio and Pennsylvania, completed the projects, borrowing heavily to do it. They nearly went bankrupt. After exiting the pipeline business in Ohio, they considered shutting down the company. But then a miracle happened. One of CECO’s core businesses is manufacturing pipeline valves. As it happens, pipelines that used to flow gas from the Gulf Coast to the northeast were beginning to reverse and flow Marcellus/Utica gas the other way. That required a special kind of valve–manufactured by CECO. You can probably guess where this story is going…
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ALLARMing – Volunteer Water Samplers Find No Impacts from Fracking

An MDN reader and friend recently forwarded along an email newsletter from the ALLARM Shale Gas Program. ALLARM stands for Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring. With the rapid growth of the Marcellus industry in Pennsylvania shale drilling in neighboring states, “concerned citizens” wanted ways to collect data on water quality impacts from shale gas activities. As a response to requests from communities, ALLARM developed a volunteer-friendly protocol in 2010 to assess small streams for the early detection and reporting of surface water contamination by shale gas extraction activities. Volunteers (i.e. anti-drillers) monitor water quality throughout the year, including conductivity, barium, strontium, and total dissolved solids–and physical parameters, including stream stage and visual observations prior to, during, and after shale gas well development. Monitors also participate in a quality assurance, quality control program which includes in-person trainings, routine meter calibration, and sample testing via split-sample analysis two times a year. Since they began monitoring local streams, nearly 5,000 observations have been logged. And what have we learned from all of this monitoring? That shale gas drilling is safe for local streams…
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U.S. CO2 Emissions Dropped Another 1.7% in 2016, Thx to Shale Gas

The main reason anti-drillers are hellbent on preventing any new drilling, and indeed the use of natural gas, is because it’s a “fossil fuel” and when burned, it creates carbon dioxide (CO2). However, what many non-thinking antis often overlook is that the use of natural gas instead of coal, oil and other fossil fuels leads to LESS carbon dioxide emissions. They blather on about limiting natural gas usage when it is because of natgas that CO2 emissions continue to go DOWN, year after year. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has just published an article highlighting the fact that CO2 emissions in the U.S. went down again in 2016–mostly because of a change from using coal to generate electricity to using natural gas, much of it extracted from the Marcellus/Utica…
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Marcellus & Utica Shale Story Links: Tue, Apr 11, 2017

The “best of the rest” – stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading. In today’s lineup: Natgas prices heading lower post-2017 due to Marcellus/Utica; board turnover at Rice Energy; Dominion Cove Point introduces fuel gas into power block; Columbiana County tax revenues skyrocket thx to Utica; ODNR issues 23 Utica permits; PA Senate Majority leader not necessarily opposed to severance tax; Vermont AG caught refusing FOIA requests from those who don’t share his political views; oilfield jobs coming back; Exxon’s shale oil dilemma; more fake news from Columbia J-School; and more!
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