Energy Stories of Interest: Mon, Jan 7, 2019

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: 19 rigs active in Ohio during last year of 2018; SEDA-COG aims to bring natural gas to farms; Columbia Gas outage in Donora, warming centers set up; Court case validates severance tax; FERC approves Cheniere’s Corpus Christi Train 2 commissioning; Months-long lockout of Mass. gas workers could end today; New Mexico may reconsider decision on more natural gas wells; The trade war with China is over, and we won; U.S. liquefied natural gas hits record highs again; Energy Awards for 2018 (satire); More U.S. LPG export terminals needed?; Canada’s natural gas crisis is being ignored; Fracking, energy renaissance, and Russian resistance; It’s immoral to leave the world’s poor in the dark; European gas market braces for price slump.
Continue reading

Energy Stories of Interest: Thu, Jan 3, 2019

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: Four permits issued in Ohio’s Utica; PA Rep. Daryl Metcalfe named new Republican Chair of House Environmental Committee; Weirton-Steubenville corridor sees nation’s highest percentage of construction job growth; Gov. Charlie Baker signs law requiring greater engineering oversight of natural gas work; U.S. natural gas producers, facing bottlenecks, practically giving gas away; How fracking enriches education in Texas – the rest of the story; Sempra sheds non-utility U.S. natural gas storage facilities; Energy commodity prices fell significantly in the last quarter of 2018; Here’s what to expect from oil in 2019; Chesapeake Energy, fracking pioneer, bet on oil – then prices plunged; Annual natural gas storage ‘deficit’ will turn into ‘surplus’ by mid-January; With an eye on record flow from Russia, gas market braces for slump; Russian natural gas flows to Germany, Slovakia up 2% on year in 2018 at 132.5 Bcm; Warnings of LNG supply shortages after 2022 should be taken seriously.
Continue reading

Energy Stories of Interest: Wed, Dec 12, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: EQT postpones conference call to discuss 2019 guidance and updated analyst presentation; A push to make fracking waste water usable in agriculture – even for drinking; Cheniere ships first Corpus Christi LNG commissioning cargo; Sleepless nights for U.S. gas traders as volatility surges; Yamal LNG ramps up to full capacity; Cuadrilla pauses gas fracking at English site after more tremors.
Continue reading

Energy Stories of Interest: Wed, Sep 5, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: Dominion Energy/SCANA merger achieves another key milestone; Alamance County, NC commissioners oppose Mountain Valley Pipeline; Schlumberger CEO warns transport constraints to slow shale gains; Venture Global’s two Louisiana projects would double U.S. LNG exports; Investing in the Energy Sector 101; Stanford researchers discuss how to reduce major cause of oil and gas production emissions; Natural gas is already a bridge fuel; Melting Arctic creates new opportunities for LNG; Big Oil’s LNG obsession; and more!
Continue reading

Energy Stories of Interest: Thu, Aug 9, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: Repurposing existing pipelines is safe AND necessary; Roanoke radical activist booted from state board following misuse of credentials to protest pipeline; why your family left New York (and other families are too); China LNG tariffs may affect Permian oil drilling; shale drillers boosting capital expenditures this year; investment advisory firms outed as political hucksters trying to pressure fossil fuel companies; Goldman Sachs tries to buy tanker full of LNG; Russians producing more LNG from Arctic; the shale boom that will never happen, in Mexico; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Tue, May 29, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: Cornell kids call for gas companies to work with EPA to fix leaks; more jobs on the way in the Ohio Utica; Utica Shale Academy graduates 22 students; Town of Maine (Broome County, NY) wants county help in extending natgas pipeline; more gas pipelines coming to the Permian; are Trump’s steel tariffs hampering oil & gas?; Congress challenges “Super OPEC”; Japan cozies up to Russians, eyes Yamal LNG participation; Shell cozies up the Russians too; China prepares to buy a LOT more US LNG; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Wed, May 23, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: NTE Energy starts up $600M SW Ohio electric plant; Shell posts production operator jobs for cracker plant; Exxon employees contribute more than $852K to Ohio colleges; Duke Energy Ohio gets a new president; Cheniere Energy approves spending big $ on 3rd LNG unit; electric cars see slow growth; U.S. oil price hits 3 1/2 year high; EPA Admin. Pruitt’s reg rollbacks hit some potholes; US LNG gushes into Asia; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Wed, Apr 4, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: Six permits awarded in Ohio Utica last week; study verifies Appalachia’s petechem advantage; Freeport, PA voting on XTO wells this month; merger forms largest Permian shale driller; western natgas markets whacked by other regions; American concerns over energy near record lows; Baker Hughes considers selling gas metering biz; big US money behind Canadian pipeline protests; Cuadrilla completes drilling UK’s first shale well; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Tue, Mar 27, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: FERC denies stay of Mountaineer Xpress, Gulf Xpress; rural OH schools benefit from pipeline tax revenue; Range Resources’ CFO retiring in May; comment period of DRBC frack ban rules ends Friday; LNG in Jacksonville; Chevron’s climate court case kind of like Big Tobacco; gas is the new oil; climate change lawsuit avalanche is coming; Trump to name Energy Dept. official as top aide; Russian LNG heads to India; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Fri, Mar 2, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading: EQT establishes new record of charitable giving in 2017; students get hands on experience with Cabot; natgas prices continue to fall for DTE gas customers; why New England is importing LNG from Russia; no scientific support for study claiming Exxon misled public on climate change; natgas remains most-consumed fuel in U.S. industrial sector; Russian gas deliveries to Europe hit new record high; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Wed, Feb 21, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading. In today’s lineup: How’s the Rice Energy into EQT merger going?; Antero appoints new member to Board; Crawford/Venango counties get new natgas buses; East Coast natgas prices hit all-time highs during cold snap; law prof says California climate change lawsuits are a for-sure loser; EIA says ethane consumption, exports will increase this year; frac sand shortage threatens shale boom; Cheniere talks with Panama Canal about more LNG shipments; and more!
Continue reading

Other Energy Stories of Interest: Tue, Feb 20, 2018

The “best of the rest”–stories that caught MDN’s eye that you may be interested in reading. In today’s lineup: PA’s rig count hits highest level since 2015; OH compressor company returns to full employment; Bethlehem wants PennEast Pipeline moved; NY in a natgas death spiral; U.S. northeastern economy at risk from high energy costs; flaring still a problem in ND; Democrat Mayor in Illinois wants to slap 4% tax on natgas; my bloody valentine (natgas stats); U.S. methane emissions have virtually no impact on climate; OPEC & shale together keep oil above $60/barrel; China-Russia gas pipeline; and more!
Continue reading

Boston Globe Takes Aim at Mass. Politicians Blocking Gas Pipelines

It’s fun to watch the left eat its own. That’s exactly what’s happening in Boston. We’ve provided a fair bit of coverage on the issue of lack of pipelines in New England and the fallout from it. Because of lack of natural gas pipelines, both natural gas AND electricity prices in New England are sky high. Natgas is used to generate most of New England’s electricity. When it gets cold out, residents and businesses use more natgas for heat, causing a shortage of natgas, further causing insane price hikes. At some point, there just won’t be any more gas at any price–and that’s when rolling blackouts begin. It will happen sooner than you think. Important politicians in New England, like U.S. Senator Elizabeth “Pocahontas” Warren and Attorney General Maura Healey (both from Massachusetts) have actively worked to block new natgas pipelines. The result? LNG tankers with illegal Russian gas are supplying a good share of the region’s natgas supplies during cold snaps. It’s disgusting. It’s so disgusting, even the far-left libs who write and edit the Boston Globe can’t stand it anymore. The Globe published an editorial yesterday titled “Our Russian ‘pipeline,’ and its ugly toll,” taking Healey and the enviro left to task. Yeah, it’s fun to watch the left eat its own!…
Continue reading

Can Virtual Pipelines Rescue New England from Russian LNG?

The whole story of Russian LNG coming to Boston to help New England with its crisis shortage of natural gas continues to irk us. Although Russia and the Yamal plant where the gas was liquefied were sanctioned under President Obama. However, the actual gas itself was/is not sanctioned, for whatever reason. We have a situation where New England continues to obstinately refuse new natgas pipelines, instead buying LNG from Russia during critical shortages. We’re paying (and depending on) our enemies for natural gas when world-class supplies of it exist a few hundred miles away in the Marcellus. We’ve written about this confounding situation since early January (see our Russian LNG stories here). Last Friday the co-founder of NG Advantage–a “virtual pipeline” company that compresses natural gas from interstate pipelines and transports it, via trucks, to businesses and organizations that want gas but can’t get it via pipelines–wrote an intriguing blog post. Tom Evslin’s post makes a case for using virtual pipelines (i.e. CNG transported by trucks) as an alternative to help alleviate the extreme winter shortages in New England. Could trucked CNG (and LNG) actually eliminate the need for a pipeline to New England? We would argue “no.” However, without a doubt a virtual pipeline could help in certain places and under certain circumstances. Here’s Tom’s argument in favor of using virtual pipelines to alleviate New England’s stubbornly high prices for natural gas, and possibly save us from importing Russian LNG…
Continue reading

NYT, Boston Globe Delve into Russian Gas Coming to America

The more we read about and dig into the story of Russian gas coming to Boston, the angrier we get. Just yesterday we told you that a rumored second shipment of Russian gas may be heading to Boston (see 2nd LNG Tanker with Russian Gas Coming to Boston?!). We have more details about the story. According to a New York Times article, in 2014 then-President Obama slapped sanctions on the “financiers and producers of Russian oil and natural gas, not the output.” Russia, at that time and since, has tried to “destabilize eastern Ukraine” with an ongoing occupation of Crimea. Sanctions against the financial services and energy sectors followed. Vladimir Putin (one of his cronies) was building an LNG export plant in the Arctic–Yamal LNG. The sanctions were aimed at stopping the plant from getting built–but it got built anyway with the help of Chinese banks. Yamal’s very first shipment of LNG recently left the facility and (as we previously outlined) was offloaded for a couple of days in the UK (see Confirmed: LNG Coming to Boston on Jan 22 is Illegal Russian Gas). What we still don’t understand is this: How can you impose sanctions on the financers and producers, but not on the outcome, the production (gas) itself? That seems crazy. We still think the gas is illegal–but nobody in D.C. (wake up Trump Administration!) is doing anything to stop it. Regardless of whether or not the shipments are illegal, even the far-left libs at the Boston Globe think this is nuts. It is humiliating (and an outrage) that sanctioned Russian gas–the VERY FIRST SHIPLOAD–is now being unloaded in Boston Harbor…
Continue reading