Studies Show How Much Shale Wastewater Produced, Recycled in M-U

University of Texas at Austin researchers have just published two new wastewater studies in two different peer-reviewed journals. One study quantifies, for the first time, how much water is produced from oil and natural gas operations in major shale plays (including the Marcellus) compared with how much is needed for fracking. In some plays, there is so much water coming out of the ground from oil and gas wells (after fracking, called produced water) that the volume coming out is more than enough to drill and frack all of the new wells in those plays. No freshwater sources required. In the Marcellus, we use more water than could be provided by recycling produced water from our wells. The second study looks at the potential for using produced water in other sectors, like agriculture, for those plays where there is an abundance of extra produced water.
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EIA Says NatGas in Storage Will Hit Record High Later This Year

Last week MDN told you that our favorite government agency, the U.S. Energy Information Administration, predicts natural gas production from the country’s seven largest shale plays will decrease in March (see EIA: Shale NatGas Production Declines First Time in 39 Months). The trend has reversed and is now heading in the downward direction. Yet this week the same EIA published a post to say natural gas inventories (i.e. storage) will reach a record high later this year. Less production but more storage? How does that work??
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Economist Reveals What Happens if Frack Ban Becomes Reality

You’ve read the news that Democrats like Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, along with most (if not all) of the Democrat presidential candidates, support a full-on ban of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas (see Crazy Bernie & AOC Intro Bill to Ban ALL Fracking in 5 Years). What, specifically, would happen to the American economy if that actually happened? We have the answer, and it’s not pretty. Forbes contributor and Distinguished Fellow at the Energy Policy Research Foundation (EPRINC), Michael Lynch, has just published a new study (full copy below) that answers the question of what happens if America bans fracking.
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EIA Says NatGas Production Continues to Increase Until 2050

Our favorite government agency, the U.S. Energy Information Administration, is out with another intriguing post. EIA takes a look at their best estimates of natural gas production in the U.S. over the next 30 years, to 2050. When the number crunchers at EIA analyze this stuff, they run multiple scenarios. One scenario (or “case”) assumes a rosy picture, with high oil and gas supplies. Another case assumes high oil prices. Another case assumes low oil prices. And yet another case assumes low oil and gas supplies. Finally, there is the “reference” case–or the scenario EIA thinks is most likely to happen. As the data geeks look out over the next three decades, in all but one of their scenarios/cases they see natural gas production increase.
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Shell Annual Outlook Says LNG Demand to Double by 2040

Royal Dutch Shell, one of the world’s supermajors (oil and gas driller), is, in fact, one of (perhaps THE) largest producer of LNG, or liquefied natural gas, in the world. The company has just released its fourth annual LNG Outlook 2020 (full copy below) which highlights key trends in 2019 and hauls out the crystal ball to predict where things are heading over the next 20 years. Shell says global demand for LNG is expected to double to 700 million tonnes by 2040. Why? Because natgas emits less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than other alternatives.
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EIA: Shale NatGas Production Declines First Time in 39 Months

We knew this day would come (although we secretly wished it never would). Our favorite government agency, the U.S. Energy Information Administration, yesterday released our favorite monthly report–the Drilling Productivity Report (DPR). The DPR chronicles how much oil and gas the country’s seven largest shale plays produced last month and their prediction for the coming month. For the first time in 39 months, the combined natural gas output of the seven shale plays will decrease instead of increase. But what a run it’s been! With gas prices in the basement and drillers slashing budgets and people, this was bound to happen. However, shale oil output will hit a new record in March: 9.18 million barrels per day.
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Gov’t Study Finds Marcellus Drilling Does NOT Affect PA Streams

A brand new study (full copy below) published in the peer-reviewed Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) looked at 25 small watersheds over the course of 2 years in northeastern Pennsylvania, looking for any possible correlation between fracking and local streams. Know what they found? There is NO impact from fracking on local streams. NONE. Those who worked on the study include researchers from the US Geological Survey, the Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP), and the Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR).
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Deloitte Oil & Gas M&A – Looking Back at 2019, Forward to 2020

Powerhouse consulting firm Deloitte released its “2020 Oil and Gas M&A Outlook” report yesterday (full copy below). In something of a surprise (for us), the experts at Deloitte found that the number of mergers and acquisitions in the oil and gas space went DOWN in 2019, although the value of the deals was up (due to big deals like Occidental’s $55 billion buyout of Anadarko). What’s ahead in 2020? More of the same, according to Deloitte. Wait–aren’t drillers dropping like flies, not able to turn a profit so they’re selling and merging? No, not really.
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EIA: U.S. on Track for CO2 Emissions 4% Lower in 2050 than 2019

If you add up all of the forms of energy used by the U.S.–electric power generation, transportation, home and business heating and cooling, etc.–and you measure the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) all of that energy usage pumps into earth’s precious atmosphere, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says the CO2 we will pump out in 2050 will be 4% LESS than what we pumped out in 2019. And that’s with continued heavy use of fossil fuels. Which exposes the lie that we must dump the use of fossil fuels now, certainly by 2050, or we’ll all die from high temperatures.
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Study: Landowners Who Claim Frack Pollution, It’s All in Your Head

A fascinating new study has just been published in the peer-reviewed journal Science of The Total Environment. The new study, titled “Characterizing anecdotal claims of groundwater contamination in shale energy basins,” looks at the perception of landowners who say local fracking activities have impacted (polluted) their water wells–versus reality. The study finds that in most cases the so-called pollution problems of these water wells is (using our own words here) “all in the heads” of the landowners. It’s not real. Fracking, in fact, has NOT caused the pollution of their wells. Researchers studied wells in the Texas Barnett and Eagle Ford, the Louisiana Haynesville, and (yep) the Pennsylvania Marcellus–in Dimock.
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EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2020 Says Gas Under $4/Mcf Thru 2050

According to our favorite government agency, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the price of natural gas will, on average, remain below $4 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf) for (gasp)–the next 30 years. You read that right. Lower for longer is, according to EIA, the reality for the next full generation. EIA recently released its “Annual Energy Outlook 2020” (full copy below). In addition to low gas prices, EIA predicts that so-called renewables will eclipse natural gas in electricity production by 2050. We say: When pigs fly.
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Recycled Pap: Yale Study Says Fracking Causes STDs in Mult. States

What is it about Yale University researchers and their obsession with sexually transmitted diseases? It seems like an unhealthy obsession to us. The same Yale brain trust that brought us a sham “study” in 2018 that said fracking causes STDs in Ohio (see Yale Study Claims Ohio Utica Fracking Causes STDs) has just published a new “study” to say the same thing happens in Colorado, North Dakota, and Texas too. Another “f” word certainly can cause STDs, but not fracking. Perhaps the “researchers” got their semantics mixed up?
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Natural Gas is King of New England’s Energy Sources

The regional transmission organization (RTO) that oversees the electric grid in New England states is called ISO New England. The organization has just published new data for 2019 which contains some interesting statistics. For example, in 2019, some 48.5% of all the electricity generated in the region (the #1 source) was generated by (yep)…natural gas. That number has been pretty consistent over the past five years. The #2 source of electric generation was nuclear, at 30%. The #3 source was hydro, which produced 9% of New England’s electricity. Wait, what about wind and solar? You know, the blessed renewables that will SAVE THE PLANET. How much did they produce last year?
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EIA: U.S. Net Natural Gas Exports to Double by 2021

For many years the U.S. has imported natural gas. When you look at how much natural gas we import versus how much we now export, via LNG and pipelines, the difference is a number called “net exports.” The U.S. now exports more natural gas than it imports. The U.S. Energy Information Administration is fresh out with a report that says our “net export” number is set to *double* in the next two years.
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EIA Jan ’20 Drilling Report: M-U NatGas Production Drops Again

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) and their monthly Drilling Productivity Report (DPR), the Marcellus/Utica region will produce 56 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) less of natural gas in the coming month of February than it will have produced in this month of January. That’s the second month in a row M-U gas production has dropped in the modern shale era. Last month’s DPR forecast a 74 MMcf/d drop for this month (see EIA Dec ’19 Drilling Report: M-U Production Drops 1st Time in Yrs).
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Florida Ports an Important New Customer for M-U Natural Gas

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For some time, we’ve had our eye on Jacksonville, Florida, concerning LNG. In July 2018 Eagle LNG opened its Maxville facility which liquefies natural gas into LNG for loading onto ships that use it as fuel (see Marc/Utica Gas Trucked to Jacksonville, FL for Use in LNG Ship). Eagle LNG is also working on a full-blown (smallish) LNG export plant near Jacksonville too (see Eagle Hires Matrix to Build Jacksonville, FL LNG Export Plant). In May 2019 we told you about another small-scale LNG facility in Jacksonville, the JAX LNG facility (see First US “Small-Scale” LNG Facility Launches in Jacksonville, FL). But Jacksonville isn’t the only port that wants LNG. Far from it!
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